FAQ for SHARI, DINAH, and BRIAN

The following are Frequently Asked Questions for the SHARI, DINAH and BRIAN products

SHARI is designed as a kit for construction and use in the amateur radio service by licensed amateur radio operators who can assure that the SHARI kit they are building meets required operating requirements including frequency, bandwidth and required power levels at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies.

 As you know, SHARI implements a Raspberry Pi hosted Allstar node using a NiceRF SA818(U/V) as the node radio operating in the amateur VHF (2 meter) or UHF (70 cm) band.  The SA818 does not have FCC authorization but Part 97 of the FCC rules allows amateur radio operators to design, build and modify their own equipment for use in the ham bands so use of the SA818 is allowed to build your own equipment on amateur frequencies.  The SA818 we supply with the SHARI kit has a custom microcontroller so that it can not be programmed outside the applicable amateur band. We also have included a low pass output filter in the kit design to ensure that the assembled SHARI kit meets Part 97 spurious emission limits.

Finally, we require purchasers of our BRIAN and SHARI kits to have a valid amateur radio license.

The SHARI products are available for the ham 70 cm (420-450 MHz) and 2 meter (144-148 MHz) bands. They can not be programmed to operate outside these frequencies.

BRIAN is designed as a kit for construction and use in the amateur radio service by licensed amateur radio operators who can assure that the BRIAN kit they are building meets required operating requirements including frequency, bandwidth and required power levels at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies.
   
 As you know, BRIAN implements a Raspberry Pi hosted Allstar node using the circuit board and other parts from a Baofeng BF-888S as the node radio operating in the amateur UHF (70 cm) band.  The Baofeng BF888S has been tested and authorized for operation at GMRS frequencies by the manufacturer (FCC ID ZP5BF-888S) but as soon as you disassemble the BF888S you have purchased for use in a BRIAN kit that authorization is no longer valid.

 However, Part 97 of the FCC rules allows amateur radio operators to design, build and modify their own equipment for use in the ham bands so use of the board from the BF888S is permitted on amateur frequencies.  Thus we require purchasers of our BRIAN and SHARI kits to have a valid amateur radio license.

No. A thermally conductive pad is used to heatsink the Pi4 CPU and RAM to the Neo case. So the case becomes a big heatsink for the CPU and RAM. There are no individual heatsinks for the CPU and RAM. The case itself does not have exit air vent holes. The exterior of the case becomes noticeably warm. With the SA818 module in RX, I just measured a Pi4-2 GB CPU temperature (using cpu_stats in HamVOIP) of 115 degrees F (46C) . The temperature of the cover of the case was 90 degrees F (32C). With the SA818 module transmitting continuously, the CPU temperature rose to 122 degrees F (50C). This is 30 degrees C below the point where the Pi4 CPU frequency is throttled to reduce power dissipation. The case cover rose to 93 degrees F (34C).

The SA818 radio module in the SHARI PiXX and PiHatX products are programmed using a Python program called SA818-prog running on the Raspberry Pi server for your Allstar node.

No, the USB connectors on the Pi3 and Pi4 are in different positions and the Pi4 runs slightly hotter. Please join the SHARI group (www.groups.io/g/shari) to review the setup and configuration manual.

Yes. Shipping prices depend on your address and Country. We use DHL or U.S. Priority Mail. We do not use the regular U.S. shipping service as we would not be able to track the shipments properly and delivery times would be very very long.

We charge the fees that we are charged to us by either DHL or the U.S. Post Office. It is possible for us to combine orders with another person in your Country so shipping fees can be split.

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